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hurtanminttu:

Morbius is the best not-vampire vampire. Also some Wandas and Beckys from the new 2013 comic.

— 1 week ago with 152 notes

marvelentertainment:

Can’t wait until January to sink your teeth into MORBIUS: THE LIVING VAMPIRE? Check out today’s liveblog as writer Joe Keatinge and editor Sana Amanat preview what’s coming up!

— 1 week ago with 224 notes

thecyberwolf:

Marvel Characters Babies Concept

by Skottie Young

Deviant Art - Tumblr - Twitter

— 1 week ago with 4758 notes
mudwerks:

(via Brian Bolland Batman:The Killing Joke Page 14 Original | Lot #92035 | Heritage Auctions)

Brian Bolland - Batman:The Killing Joke Page 14 Original Art (DC,1988)…

mudwerks:

(via Brian Bolland Batman:The Killing Joke Page 14 Original | Lot #92035 | Heritage Auctions)

Brian Bolland - Batman:The Killing Joke Page 14 Original Art (DC,1988)…

(via megagooch)

— 1 week ago with 164 notes

katsukat:

Color Palette #93 (Maka and Crona- Soul Eater)

Things I also ship besides Maka and Soul.

I started messing with the color palette challenge a couple of days ago and it turned out to more fun and challenging than I thought it’d be. I’ll probably try to complete the whole set with different fandoms. I’ll take suggestions for other things to draw, but I won’t guarantee that I’ll do them because I’m a terrible person that doesn’t always finish or start requests. >__>; But I hope you enjoy these anyways. 

— 3 weeks ago with 146 notes
repliclit:

Coatlicue (pronounced koh-ah-tlee-kweh) is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. She is also known as Toci (Tocî, “our grandmother”) and Cihuacoatl (Cihuācōhuātl, “the lady of the serpent”), the patron of women who die in childbirth.
The word “Coatlicue” is Nahuatl for “the one with the skirt of serpents.” She is referred to variously by the epithets “Mother Goddess of the Earth who gives birth to all celestial things”, “Goddess of Fire and Fertility”, “Goddess of Life, Death and Rebirth”, and “Mother of the Southern Stars.”
She is represented as a woman wearing a skirt of writhing snakes and a necklace made of human hearts, hands, and skulls. Her feet and hands are adorned with claws and her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from nursing. Her face is formed by two facing serpents (after her head was cut off and the blood spurt forth from her neck in the form of two gigantic serpents), referring to the myth that she was sacrificed during the beginning of the present creation.
Most Aztec artistic representations of this goddess emphasize her deadly side, because Earth, as well as loving mother, is the insatiable monster that consumes everything that lives. She represents the devouring mother, in whom both the womb and the grave exist.
According to Aztec legend, she was once magically impregnated by a ball of feathers that fell on her while she was sweeping a temple, and subsequently gave birth to the gods Quetzalcoatl and Xolotl. Her daughter Coyolxauhqui then rallied Coatlicue’s four hundred other children together and goaded them into attacking and decapitating their mother. The instant she was killed, the god Huitzilopochtli suddenly emerged from her womb fully grown and armed for battle. He killed many of his brothers and sisters, including Coyolxauhqui, whose head he cut off and threw into the sky to become the moon. In one variation on this legend, Huitzilopochtli himself is the child conceived in the ball-of-feathers incident and is born just in time to save his mother from harm.
A new article by Cecelia Klein argues that the famous Coatlicue statue in the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico, and several other complete and fragmentary versions, may actually represent a personified snake skirt. The reference is to one version of the creation of the present Sun. The myth relates that the present Sun began after the gods gathered at Teotihuacan and sacrificed themselves. The best known version states that Tezzictecatl and Nanahuatzin immolated themselves, becoming respectively the moon and the sun. However, other versions add a group of female deities to those who sacrificed themselves, including Coatlicue. Afterwards the Aztecs were said to have worshipped the skirts of these women, which came back to life. Coatlicue thus has creative aspects, which may balance the skulls, hearts, hands, and claws that connect her to the earth deity Tlaltecuhtli. The earth both consumes and regenerates life.

Stephanie Guajardo, Coatlicue

repliclit:

Coatlicue (pronounced koh-ah-tlee-kweh) is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. She is also known as Toci (Tocî, “our grandmother”) and Cihuacoatl (Cihuācōhuātl, “the lady of the serpent”), the patron of women who die in childbirth.

The word “Coatlicue” is Nahuatl for “the one with the skirt of serpents.” She is referred to variously by the epithets “Mother Goddess of the Earth who gives birth to all celestial things”, “Goddess of Fire and Fertility”, “Goddess of Life, Death and Rebirth”, and “Mother of the Southern Stars.”

She is represented as a woman wearing a skirt of writhing snakes and a necklace made of human hearts, hands, and skulls. Her feet and hands are adorned with claws and her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from nursing. Her face is formed by two facing serpents (after her head was cut off and the blood spurt forth from her neck in the form of two gigantic serpents), referring to the myth that she was sacrificed during the beginning of the present creation.

Most Aztec artistic representations of this goddess emphasize her deadly side, because Earth, as well as loving mother, is the insatiable monster that consumes everything that lives. She represents the devouring mother, in whom both the womb and the grave exist.

According to Aztec legend, she was once magically impregnated by a ball of feathers that fell on her while she was sweeping a temple, and subsequently gave birth to the gods Quetzalcoatl and Xolotl. Her daughter Coyolxauhqui then rallied Coatlicue’s four hundred other children together and goaded them into attacking and decapitating their mother. The instant she was killed, the god Huitzilopochtli suddenly emerged from her womb fully grown and armed for battle. He killed many of his brothers and sisters, including Coyolxauhqui, whose head he cut off and threw into the sky to become the moon. In one variation on this legend, Huitzilopochtli himself is the child conceived in the ball-of-feathers incident and is born just in time to save his mother from harm.

A new article by Cecelia Klein argues that the famous Coatlicue statue in the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico, and several other complete and fragmentary versions, may actually represent a personified snake skirt. The reference is to one version of the creation of the present Sun. The myth relates that the present Sun began after the gods gathered at Teotihuacan and sacrificed themselves. The best known version states that Tezzictecatl and Nanahuatzin immolated themselves, becoming respectively the moon and the sun. However, other versions add a group of female deities to those who sacrificed themselves, including Coatlicue. Afterwards the Aztecs were said to have worshipped the skirts of these women, which came back to life. Coatlicue thus has creative aspects, which may balance the skulls, hearts, hands, and claws that connect her to the earth deity Tlaltecuhtli. The earth both consumes and regenerates life.

Stephanie Guajardo, Coatlicue

(via freetherob0ts)

— 3 weeks ago with 652 notes

asylum-art:

The Works of Nicola Samorì

The paintings of Italian artist, Nicola Samori, are full of sensuous energy. The thirty-five year old’s style is derived from the classical paintings of early renaissance masters. With the highest degree of precession, his figures emerge from the darkness of pictorial space into the light with dramatic realism.

Samori’s methodology is one that intertwines both violence and romance, which make his paintings all the more painful: He distorts them, smears them with his hand, disfigures hem with the palette knife, paints them over, or like a torturer removes the half-dry skin of the uppermost layer of paint with a scalpel. Yet, through this destructive deconstruction, his compositions have an eery sense of beauty and elegance.

(via troublicious)

— 3 weeks ago with 2535 notes
swiggityswackpaintitblack:

homestuckcrockpot:

funfrom4chan:

To Infinity

why does this have more notes

i fucking

swiggityswackpaintitblack:

homestuckcrockpot:

funfrom4chan:

To Infinity

why does this have more notes

i fucking

(Source: givemeinternet, via moraleezy)

— 3 weeks ago with 987510 notes